Skip to main content

About your Search

20130101
20130131
SHOW
( more )
STATION
MSNBCW 36
CNNW 35
KQED (PBS) 33
CSPAN 28
FOXNEWS 24
KRCB (PBS) 23
CSPAN2 22
MSNBC 21
LINKTV 15
WETA 15
WHUT (Howard University Television) 13
CNN 11
WJZ (CBS) 10
FBC 9
WRC (NBC) 9
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 406
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 415 (some duplicates have been removed)
experiences in israel where she's lived off and on since 2006. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon, welcome. i'm the director here at the hudson institute, a son sore on islam, democracy, and the future of the islam world which publishing a journal on islamism called "current trends in islamic ideology," which i co-edit with my colleagues ambassador haqqani and eric brown. it's my pleasure to host today's event. its subject is a wonderful new book by my guest, lelya gilbert, and here it is. its title is "saturday people, sunday people: israel through the eyes of a christian so jowrner," and ms. gilbert is here to discuss her book with us. before introducing and turning to the book itself, let me say a few words by way of introduction about herself. she has had a very impressive and varied career, much of it concerned with the arts including music. she has been a song writer and worked extensively with musical groups including an african children's chorus based in uganda and based of uganda and orphans. she passed on her gifts two her two sons, colin and dylan. co
-- greeks on the ground. it is midday in london, 2 p.m. in damascus, where syria has accused israel of carrying out an airstrike in its territory. there has been a reaction from bashar al-assad's allies in moscow. the foreign ministry there has condemn the attack. there is mounting concern about the react -- retaliation in israel itself. there are competing accounts of exactly what the targets were. it is thought that israel was trying to prevent the transfer of weapons to hezbollah militants in the area. >> israel has refused to comment on the reported out -- airstrikes. it always does. syrian state tv carried a military statement. the jets came in flying so low they could not be seen by radar. it gave details of what it said happened. syria's official version is that the jets struck a defense research installation northwest of damascus, destroying the building and killing two workers. but earlier reports from diplomats, security officials, and syrian rebels said there was an attack, but the target was a convoy of arms destined for hezbollah militants across the border in lebanon.
playing a key role in managing israel's overt campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. now, let get out on the stage the duo who will be arguing against tonight's resolution the world cannot tolerate iran with a nuclear capability vali nasr and fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] vali nasr leads john hopkins school of international study, he is one of the world's top exerts in the political and social developments of iran. he is the author of two best- selling books. he sits on the state department's influential board and has served as a senior advisor as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're
will face questions about his support for israel after referring to certain pro-israeli groups as a "jewish lobby" in a 2006 interview. >> i'm a united states senator. not an israeli senator. i'm a united states senator. i support israel. but my first interest is i take an oath of office to the constitution of the united states, not to a president, not to a party, not to israel. in 1988 he called james hormelthen president bill clinton's choice "openly aggressively gay." saying his sexual orientation would be an inhibiting factor. hagel has since apologized for that comment last month saying those remarks were insensitive. but outgoing congressman barney frank blasted him last night in a statement, "i cannot think of any other minority group in the u.s. today where such a negative statement and action made in 1988 would not be an obstacle to a major presidential appointment." t t the two have remained close since. the president has used that alliance as part of his sales pitch for hagel. >> i've served with chuck hagel, i know him. he is a patriot. >> senator jack reid who was also on that
jets bombed the research center near damascus and five more injured. israel has not commented on the allegations, but the israeli government had warned syria this week that it would not accept any syrian weapons falling into the hands of hezbollah. israelis are concerned about the possibility of a chemical weapons attack. people have been stockpiling gas masks for months. >> i would rather actually use it as a warning sign, by which israel is warning both hezbollah and assad that israel is well aware of what is going on. >> israelis fear for their safety. the air strikes marked an escalation in the conflict. now syria says it reserves the right to retaliate. >> in a separate development, the united nations has accused israel of violating the rights of palestinians by continuing to build settlements on occupied land. the united nations human rights council meeting in geneva called israel's settlement building creeping annexation and called on the country to stop the practice and remove all jewish settlers from the west bank. israel is boycotting the meeting as it accuses the co
israel's overt and covert campaign against iran's nuclear enrichment program. now, let's get out on the stage the equally forbiddable duo who will be orging -- arguing. leading johns hopkins prestigious school. born in tehran one of the world's top experts on the political and social development of iran. and he's the author of two best selling books, the shia revival and democracy on the iran. served as a senior advisor recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrook, former munk bedator. now, when you think of provocktiff conversation on the big foreign policy challenges of the day you have to think about our next debator. his flagship global affairs program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide. but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he writes a highly respected column for the "washington post" and is the editor at large of time magazine. his numerous best-selling books include the post american world and the future of freedom. now, we are just moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements once ag
. for our first segment we turn to israel and the occupied territories where israeli forces have begun the year with a spate of killings of unarmed palestinian civilians. so far this month five unarmed civilians have been shot dead by israeli troops. the latest in a was a 21-year- old palestinian woman who was killed when israeli forces opened fire at a west bank school. the witness said she was standing with a group of companions when they came under fire. >> two israeli soldiers traveling in a white car pointed their weapons, shooting indiscriminately at a college where the women were standing at the entrance. there was another man inside. they shot repeople and a large number of soldiers arrived. >> on monday, the israeli human- rights group that some put out a report saying israeli forces had been extensively and systematically violating their own rules of engagement when suppressing protests in the west bank. according to jesselyn, since 2005, at least 48 palestinians have been killed by live ammunition fired at people throwing stones. six more were killed by rubber coated bullets
. >> woodruff: and a margaret warner report about the threat a nuclear-armed iran poses to israel. >> if they accumulate enough uranium which is close to weapons grade, enough uranium which enables them to detonate one nuclear device: to me is clearly a redline. >> brown: former vice president al gore joins us to talk about his new book as well as money politics and the future of democracy. >> the congress is virtually incapable of passing any reforms unless they first get permission from the powerful special interests. >> woodruff: do americans trust the federal government? andrew kohut says a new pew poll shows the majority do not. >> brown: and ray suarez gets the latest on the chinese hackers who allegedly mounted a four-month cyber-attack against the "new york times." that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy
to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must maintain the strongest military in the world. >> i believe, and always have, that america must engage, not retreat, in the world, but engage in the world. my record is consistent on these points. >> woodruff: but as a nebraska senator, in 2007, hagel angered fellow republicans when he opposed the surge of u.s. troops into iraq. today, his former close friend, arizona senator john mccain made clear, they haven't forgotten. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect, yes or no? >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous. >> are you going to answer the question, senator hagel? the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like an answer on whether you were right or wrong, then you're free to
. researchers blamed a rise in temperature for what they call an unprecedented retreat. now come to israel, where talks are already underway about building a new coalition government. put they's ballot alliance led by benjamin netanyahu -- and left him in a substantially weaker position. there is a young, centrist party. we have this report from jerusalem. >> thrusting himself and his centrist party onto center stage. after a long night, about his probable role in the coalition government, a potential newcomer, he told the bbc before the election exactly what he stands for. >> somebody has to be the voice of the middle class. there is a dispute with the palestinians. we came into the political arena to become that voice. >> benjamin netanyahu is expected to bring him into a new, broad government. the government was weakened by yesterday's vote, but net non remains prime minister. he is being urged to put together as broad coalition as possible, reflecting the day-to- day concerns of the secular is really is. perhaps, some of the ultra- orthodox religious parties and recent governments. aft
israel margaret warner reports on fears of islamic militants and chemical weapons just overr thee border. >> warner: with conflict raging inside syria, israel's taking no chances. it's now fortifying the security barrier behind me to guard against any dangers that may arise. >> ifill: and from mali, lindsay hilsum has a story of celebration as french and local forces push north to capture two key towns. >> reporter: look at these people. just thrilled because they can dance. they can sing. the women can ride motor bikes. they can do all the things they haven't been able to do for the last nine months while the jihadis have been in power. >> woodruff: we close with a new edition of the daily download. tonight, can your facebook postings get you fired? >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by moving our economfor 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connec us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the o
israel margaret warner reports on fears of islamic militants and chemical weapons just over the border. >> warner: with conflict raging inside syria israel's taking no chances. it's now fortifying the security barrier behind me to guard against any dangers that may arise. >> ifill: and from mali lindsay hilsum has a story of celebration as french and local forces push north to capture two key towns. >> reporter: look at these people. just thrilled because they can dance. they can sing. the women can ride motor bikes. they can do all the things they haven't been able to do for the last nine months while the jihadis have been in power. >> woodruff: we close with a new edition of the daily download. tonight, can your facebook postings get you fired? >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the
with the financial times, thanks so much for talking to us. >> ifill: next, to israel. president obama called prime minister benjamin netanyahu today to congratulate him on his victory in last week's parliamentary elections. the two leaders spoke about ensuring security in the region at a time of growing tensions. with their elections behind them, both men plan to address the civil war in syria, the threat posed by iran's nuclear program, and the stalemate between israelis and palestinians. and those are the subjects of three stories this week from margaret warner who is on a reporting trip to israel, the west bank and gaza. she begins tonight reporting on israeli concerns about the conflict in nearby syria. >> warner: the sweeping vistas of the golan heights plateau and the bucolic life of the israelis who live here bear quiet witness to the strategic importance of this area which israel captured from syria during the 1967 arab-israeli war. but after four decades of quiet along this border, israel, just like syria's arab neighbors, is increasingly worried about the unpredictable spillover from the
because i don't think it's in the interest of israel. i just don't think it's smart for israel." guest: i have no way of knowing and i doubt that hagel is anti- semitic. the most troubling part of that has to do with the fact that he goes on to say, i am u.s. senator, i am not the senator from israel. the troubling part of that is the subtle suggestion that if you disagree with him about u.s. policies towards israel and the middle east, there is a loyalty question at stake. i think that's going to be something the senators are going to ask him about. >> in the "washington post," he says, by congressional standards, senator hagel is quite independent of israel. guest: he has always voted in favor of those aid packages. this is a complex and often taboo subject. karen david miller was a negotiator for -- aaron david miller was a negotiator. people can actually go and listen to the various recordings he did on u.s., israel issues. we have evolved -- it is a complicated issue. many people have tried to discuss it. it is a question of, what are israel's interests. there's a legitimate debate t
in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the count h moved dramically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american nsulate in benghazi, libya. four amerins we killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat se
in the region who all border syria, turkey, jordan, israel, also lebanon. and the potential for a sectarian divide between shiites and sunnis that could spread from syria, exacerbate the tensions that are already there in iraq and then down to the gulf. >> you have the arab revolution's lead to now the rise of these islamist authoritarian governments. what are the consequences of that? in syria you talk about al qaeda presence. it's unlikely an al qaeda affiliated group will take over syria or egypt. greater likelihood perhaps in egypt and not even there. what is american influence look like -- what should it look like in this post revolutionary period when there was so much excitement about the prospect of egyptian democracy taking root in way that would be in concert with the u.s. at a time when there are people very critical of the o bama administration for essentially getting out of the way, letting the revolution happen and then turning their backs on the likes of mubarak who could have at least guaranteed some level of stability? >> i think it was an illusion to imagine that we could
and we will prevent any attacks for hezbollah to smuggle such weapons from syria. is israel attacks, it means that such an attempt by hezbollah was made. >> the contagion from the violence in syria worries the whole region. syria sits on the middle east religious and political fault lines. they connect the war to all of its neighbors, whether they like it or not. the war in syria is exporting trouble. its neighbors are seeing a new threats to their security as a result of the slow collapse of the syrian state. this time, israel felt threatened but all of the country sharing borders and some further afield have seen rising tensions and in some places, bloodshed because of the war. international diplomacy is deadlocked. >> that there has been problems in the turkish border in recent weeks. there are huge flows of refugees over the jordanian border. many tensions in iraq at the moment. lebanon, many connections to syria. the longer this crisis goes on, the more people that it affects, the greater the danger. >> in syria, the victims of the latest massacre at aleppo have been buried. sy
will also be confirmed, although that's a bigger fight, and his remarks about israel that somehow he isn't tough enough on israel, his objection to sanctions was that they were unilateral. he now supports the current sanctions. he is certainly not antiisrael. those arguments will be put aside. he is there to cut the budget, and he's the man for the moment. he has the appetite to do that. >> so this prospective appointment is bypassing wall street. is that good play by obama? >> well, in the first four years of the -- of his administration, the first term, his great job was to keep the financial sector from collapsing. so he had someone intimately familiar in tim geithner with wall street. in the second four years his great job is balancing fiscal issues, and he has in jack lew somebody who, as eleanor said, knows the budget up and down, tremendous respect, a great negotiator. keep in mind, jack lew is something that people don't understand. he is a liberal fiscal hawk. he's a liberal deficit hawk. he's got very strong views on the safety net and funding of government but he really does b
it is in the interest of israel. i just do not think it is smart for israel." who'd like to comment on that? guest: there has been a lot of suggestion that senator chuck hagel might be anti-semitic. i have no way of knowing and i doubt very seriously he is. what is troubling about that quote is not so much the jewish lobby, a different way of saying something -- the israel lobby or ever. the most troubling part of that quote has to do with the fact that it goes on to say, i am a u.s. senator and not the senator from israel. the troubling part of that is the subtle suggestion that if you disagree with him about policy, u.s. policy toward israel and the middle east, somehow that you are, there is a loyal to question at stake there, that those who disagree with him are not beholden to the u.s. and the constitution as much as, also thinking they have a duty towards israel. i think that is going to be something the senators are going to ask him about. host: let me brief you about what eron david miller writes in "the washington post" from an interview he did in 2006. he says it 'senator chuck hagel is
people this way. >> cenk: it's really interesting because on the other hand israel seems to be fairly happy with him, so are we. we send in more aid and military weapons to help him. that's something you might not necessarily expect. he's deep muslim brotherhood in domestic policies of egypt, but externally seems to be saying the right things. >> externally he has not rocked the boat. i think washington and tel aviv want him not to rock the boat, so they're treating him with kid gloves in a way. but i i think he did put enormous pressure on benjamin netanyahu not to send troops into gaza. he is an ambiguous figure with regard to washington and israel. they're suspicious of him. they're caution, cautious, but he's all they got the only legitimate force in egypt. now he's undermining his legitimacy with these emergency decrees and so forth. >> cenk: then we go to an organization called black block which is not much of an organization because they have no chain of command. let me have "time" magazine describe it a little bit for you. they boast that they're willing to use force against i
information on israel and syria, and the escalating tensions there. and breaking news from yesterday on "studio b." a lineman -- rare winter tornadoes. they're saying just how much damage the storms left behind. we'll have the weather and the rest of the news after this. >>> the deadly storm system that killed at least three people in the south and knocked out power to thousands and destroyed dozens of homes. the scene now in calhoun, georgia, where a tornado tore through the area and destroyed much of this area. the tornado cut a 16-mile path, a half mile wide. angelique from our station in the atlanta year is with us from adairsville, georgia. how much damage there is? >> it's been incredible damage here. the police chief just did a briefing and told us the number now is at $75 million. he says it's about 95 structures. when you look at the houses and businesses that have been affected. 31 of those just totally destroyed. >> shepard: yesterday we heard reports of people trapped in damaged homes. everybody accounted for now? >> i've heard a lot of stories today of survival, and the
on capitol hill even among republicans. the question is his past views on several issues, including israel. >> chuck hagel if confirmed to be secretary of defense would be the most antagonistic secretary of defense toward the state of israel in our nation's history. >> we'll have more in a few moments. >>> help is on the way for people who lost so much during superstorm sandy. president obama signed into law today a $9.7 billion sandy disaster relief package. it was the first legislative action of the new congress. a larger sandy aid package will have to wait. lawmakers will consider $51 billion relief bill on january 15th. some people were outraged after house speaker boehner canceled a vote tuesday on the entire aid package. sandy devastated parts of the northeast more than two months ago. >>> syria's president bashar al assad got a standing ovation today moments before he gave a rare public speech. assad said he's standing firm against global calls for him to step down. he laid out his own plan for dealing with syria's civil war. a u.s. state department spokeswoman says assad's plan is
it a brazen attack on international law. what is unclear is what israel was targeting. israeli warplanes attacked a convoy of trucks traveling across the border of lebanon. nicole johnson is live in jerusalem. the reaction is coming in from this incident. >> that is right. we have had a response from hezbollah. it has condemned the attack inside syria, saying it is a dangerous act. we also heard from russia, which said it will be taking urgent action to clarify what has happened. there is still a great deal of uncertainty. the u.s. navy is reports in israeli officials spoke to u.s. a administration officials and informs them they are planning and carrying out an attack on an arms shipments said to be carrying russian missiles destined for hezbollah. if those missiles were surface- to-air missiles, that would be a game changer. it would make it difficult to carry out air operations in northern israel as well as southern lebanon. the israelis are concerned about this. they are concerned about the transfer of chemical weapons from syria to hezbollah and to other groups inside syria and leba
on his nomination for secretary of defense. one topic sure to come up is israel, which just launched an air strike in syria that u.s. officials say targeted a convoy of russian-made weapons that were headed for lebanon. now russia, the arab league, and hezbollah are all condemning the action. >>> and the new chairman of the senate foreign relations committee pays back $60,000 to a donor for airplane rides. and that donor is under investigation by the fbi. much more on a stranger sorry surrounding senator bob menen z menendez. good morning from washington. it's thursday, january 31st, 2013. this is "the daily rundown." i'm chuck todd. now less than 30 minutes away from the start of chuck hagel's confirmation hearing to become the next secretary of defense. we'll take you there live for his opening statement, along with what's expected to be some tough questioning from some big-name republicans. let's get right to my first read of the morning. let's start with the hagel confirmation grilling. could be the most contentious nomination hear of the president's second term and frankly, of
for republican senator chuck hagel, fellow republicans have criticized him for views on iraq, iran, and israel. then, the steubenville rape case in ohio. >> we are anonymous. around mid august 2012, a party to present a small town in ohio known as steubenville. [indiscernible] kidnapping and rape of a 15- year-old girl. >> the hacker activist group anonymous has helped expose new details about a horrific high school gang rape case involving football potyers in ohio. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. up to 18 people have been killed in the latest u.s. drone attacks on pakistan's tribal areas. the strikes hit what pakistani officials described as separate compounds belonging to the pakistani taliban in south missouri stan. the taliban commander was reportedly among the dead. the ongoing drone attacks come days after a federal judge ruled the obama administration is under no obligation to publicly disclose their legal justification. the american civil liberties union and the new york times had filed a lawsuit und
that mean for the u.s. relationship with israel? >>> and today marks the 40th anniversary of the supreme court's landmark ruling on abortion in the case of roe versus wade. this morning, new poll numbers show what a majority of the country thinks about this always controversial topic. good morning from washington. it's tuesday, january 22nd, 2013, and this is "the daily rundown." i'm chris cillizza in for the "he lost his voice" chuck todd. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. five years ago, candidate barack obama laid out his vision of the presidency, talking about leadership in an interview with the "reno gazette-journal's" editorial board. >> i think ronald reagan changed the trajectory of america, in a way that, you know, richard nixon did not. and in a way that bill clinton did not. he put us on a fundamentally different path, because the country was ready for it. >> that wasn't the way president obama talked during his first term, but that was the guy who launched his second term yesterday. in an 18-minute address, the president laid out a defense of liberalism, a fo
conclude with a look at two recent elections in the middle east, one in jordan and one in israel. we talk with jordan's ambassador to the united nations prince bin ra'ad and efraim halevy. >> when we first heard the rumblings of the arab spring some may have thought that thises with a train that was passing through the station in and out. i think his majesty understood full well that these were seismic rumblings. and the region has had for a long time been bereft of real reforms. his majesty began earlier on. and i think you know now felt that for those who had a vested interest in the stat usco, this is their time to understand-- status quo, this is their time to understand something is changing. >> there is something much more deep that going to happen in the months to am come and there have before been a few indications of this in the last 48 hoursment and that is that the problem of the relationship between religion and state between those who are orthodox and trawl orthodox and those who are to a large extent secular, how to create a society in which you have common aims, common beli
in the iran nuclear showdown as the rogue nation backs up serious threats to retaliate against israel. a very busy 24, 48 hours we'll tell you about it. randy travis's trouble with the law. could the country music star wind up spending serious time behind bars? it he is all "happening now." jenna: not a flattering mug shot of randy travis, that shot, right? jon: not something you put on an album cover. jenna: we'll have the latest. our big story, happening now the president's pick to lead the pentagon is facing his critics. i'm jenna lee. jon: good to have you back after a week away. jenna: hope you missed me desperately. jon: yes we did. i'm jon scott. whether chuck hagel will be confirmed as defense secretary the republican taking questions from his former colleagues on the senate armed services committee. many in his own party criticizing him ever sips his nomination was announced saying is not sufficiently pro-israel and he needs to be. he is criticized for his quotes on the jewish lobby and gay rights. no matter what he said in the past his world view has stayed the same. >> my overall w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 415 (some duplicates have been removed)